D.O.R.I.S. The Destroyer - Barrel-Aged

CigarStone

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From Hoppin Frog in Akron Ohio. Considered by many to be the best of the best from HF.

Hoppin Frogs flagship beer is BORIS (Bodacious Oatmeal Russian Imperial Stout) DORIS is the Double and TORIS is the triple.


Possibly the best from Hoppin Frog, and that is saying a LOT!

This beer has all the qualities of a world class beer from the pour to the after-taste.

It is dark as used motor oil and has a wonderful combination of bitterness from dark chocolate and the deep rich mellow from the barrel aging.

If you are familiar with the flavor of molasses, particularly "black strap molasses", this will intrigue you. The depth of flavor is astounding!

Considered by many members of Hoppin Frog's "Rare Beer Club" to be the best!



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CigarStone

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I did some looking and it appears that a "double" just has more ingredients added to up the flavor and the alcohol. It is definately not a marketing ploy as they are famous for their regular oatmeal Russian imperial stout, their double oatmeal Russian imperial stout, and their triple oatmeal Russian imperial stout. And each are very different in regards to flavor and strength, as well as alcohol.
 

smellysell

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I did some looking and it appears that a "double" just has more ingredients added to up the flavor and the alcohol. It is definately not a marketing ploy as they are famous for their regular oatmeal Russian imperial stout, their double oatmeal Russian imperial stout, and their triple oatmeal Russian imperial stout. And each are very different in regards to flavor and strength, as well as alcohol.
Not saying it isn't a good or different beer, but "Imperial" and "double" mean the same thing and 10.5% is pretty standard for an imperial stout (a little on the higher end). I could see a different and maybe heavier grain bill for the "double", but there's no way in hell there is even close to double the grain bill used for that as the regular imperial stout.
 

CigarStone

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Not saying it isn't a good or different beer, but "Imperial" and "double" mean the same thing and 10.5% is pretty standard for an imperial stout (a little on the higher end). I could see a different and maybe heavier grain bill for the "double", but there's no way in hell there is even close to double the grain bill used for that as the regular imperial stout.
Don't be so analytical! You sound like me!;)

Double and Imperial are not exactly the same thing. Imperial references quality, just like the word imperial means in general, better .... higher grade, etc. Double references more. So, a double imperial is better ingredients and more of it.🥳 At least that is what I was always lead to believe.


I think the double, triple, and quadruple designations are just in reference to the strength/kick and not an exact reference to the amount of grain. Their BORIS is 9.4%, their DORIS is 10.5%, their TORIS is 13.8%, and their QORIS is 15.7%.
 

smellysell

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Don't be so analytical! You sound like me!;)

Double and Imperial are not exactly the same thing. Imperial references quality, just like the word imperial means in general, better .... higher grade, etc. Double references more. So, a double imperial is better ingredients and more of it.🥳 At least that is what I was always lead to believe.


I think the double, triple, and quadruple designations are just in reference to the strength/kick and not an exact reference to the amount of grain. Their BORIS is 9.4%, their DORIS is 10.5%, their TORIS is 13.8%, and their QORIS is 15.7%.
Sorry, but imperial absolutely means the same thing as double in brewing, just higher gravity. Has nothing to do with quality of ingredients.
 

The Black Cloud

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Yeah, I believe "double" is pretty much synonymous with "imperial". Depends on what the respective brewery chooses to name. Regardless, it denotes a stronger and more hefty version of the original.

Justin, who used to brew, would know much more than I, but the beer isn't brewed twice, just brewed to be stronger and more intense.
 

Johnny-O!

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I was thinking of a beer from Belgium that is brewed twice and three times, Grimbergen. They use the words double and tripple. Its pricey and hard to find in the US. I was in northern Spain a few years ago and found it in a gas station of all places at 1 Euro per bottle for the double. Brewing it twice really does something to the beer. Boris is delicious stuff and I'm sure anything else they make. John
 

CigarStone

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Sorry, but imperial absolutely means the same thing as double in brewing, just higher gravity. Has nothing to do with quality of ingredients.
I always thought that the term Imperial came about when Russia started to make Stout with Imperial ingredients?
 

The Black Cloud

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I was thinking of a beer from Belgium that is brewed twice and three times, Grimbergen. They use the words double and tripple. Its pricey and hard to find in the US. I was in northern Spain a few years ago and found it in a gas station of all places at 1 Euro per bottle for the double. Brewing it twice really does something to the beer. Boris is delicious stuff and I'm sure anything else they make. John
I love Belgian ales too, John, but I don't think they are "brewed twice". I think "dubbel" and "tripel" just refer to a strength designation. So the dubbel is a little stronger than the pale, and the tripel is a little stronger than the dubbel. All three of which are different brews (the dubbel typically being a darker, more malty brew). Then of course there is the Quadrupel which is typically a little stronger than all aforementioned.

Though, I think when you factor in multiple mash boils, fermentations, and bottle conditioning, I guess "brewing the beer twice" can get a little misconstrued. But I ain't a brewer, so take my words with a grain of salt.
 

The Black Cloud

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I always thought that the term Imperial came about when Russia started to make Stout with Imperial ingredients?
I heard the terminology started with brews (such as Russian Imperial Stout) that were brewed specifically for export to Russian royalty by European brewers. Similar in vein to India Pale Ales that were more heavily hopped by British brewers to withstand export shipping to expats in India.

Since there's little regulation in American brewing with regard to style naming conventions, I think in modern American craft brewing vernacular the term "imperial" just means a stronger brew.

If I'm wrong about anything, please correct me. I ain't a scholar about any of this.
 

smellysell

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I love Belgian ales too, John, but I don't think they are "brewed twice". I think "dubbel" and "tripel" just refer to a strength designation. So the dubbel is a little stronger than the pale, and the tripel is a little stronger than the dubbel. All three of which are different brews (the dubbel typically being a darker, more malty brew). Then of course there is the Quadrupel which is typically a little stronger than all aforementioned.

Though, I think when you factor in multiple mash boils, fermentations, and bottle conditioning, I guess "brewing the beer twice" can get a little misconstrued. But I ain't a brewer, so take my words with a grain of salt.
Correct, Dubbel and triple are Belgian styles. Totally different malt bills so totally different beers.

"Brewing it twice" isn't really a thing. It's an over generalization, but the brewing process is mash, sparge, boil, and ferment. There are variations to each step you can play with for sure for different results, but that's basically it.
 

CigarStone

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Correct, Dubbel and triple are Belgian styles. Totally different malt bills so totally different beers.

"Brewing it twice" isn't really a thing. It's an over generalization, but the brewing process is mash, sparge, boil, and ferment. There are variations to each step you can play with for sure for different results, but that's basically it.
Tell me what the Dogfish Head 30, 60, 90, and 120 Minutes means?
 

smellysell

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The 30 60 and 90 all taste like they could be variations of the same beer. The 120 tastes entirely different.
I think I remember that there are hop additions every minute for the designated time, but I could also be making that up. I'm sure the grain bills are different too.
 
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