Single best practice I ever developed regarding Coffee Brewing.

MadMonk

Well-Known Member
I was thinking about this earlier today.
I allow myself two constant luxuries, Coffee and Tobacco. I'ved tried countless Coffee suppliers, origins, brew methods, water temperatures, etc.

I have known for several years that the absolute best, single most broad spectrum practice I ever adapted, was weighing my coffee. I was a Barista as a kid, and learned this. Part of what I was shown was how different origin/roast level beans would measure differently, by volume. Sometimes drastically.

I brew at a about a 17.42 to 1 Ratio, by weight, water to coffee. I consistently get a great cup.

If you're a coffee nut, you owe it to yourself to get a digital scale and start weighing.
 

MNBrian

Well-Known Member
You nailed it

10 years at 15+ coffee shops and the same crap always comes up. I've got my method down to four steps.

Buy quality beans.
Grind them on the right setting for your brew method.
Measure the right proportions.
Use high quality (filtered) water.

It's my own personal brewing bible.
 

Undegreed

You're unique...just like everyone else
I was thinking about this earlier today.
I allow myself two constant luxuries, Coffee and Tobacco. I'ved tried countless Coffee suppliers, origins, brew methods, water temperatures, etc.

I have known for several years that the absolute best, single most broad spectrum practice I ever adapted, was weighing my coffee. I was a Barista as a kid, and learned this. Part of what I was shown was how different origin/roast level beans would measure differently, by volume. Sometimes drastically.

I brew at a about a 17.42 to 1 Ratio, by weight, water to coffee. I consistently get a great cup.

If you're a coffee nut, you owe it to yourself to get a digital scale and start weighing.
MM, I am a dedicated follower of read more and post less. It's odd that your post here has made the list of topics that I respond to. What has piqued my interest is your use of hundredths in proportions. As an engineer I get accused of "designing with a micrometer, when it's built with a backhoe," on a regular basis. Sooo...I'm curious does a hundredth of a proportion really matter in the brewing of an excellent cup of coffee? For the record, I have a great amount of respect for your insights in numerous threads, so don't take this as an assault but more of a somewhat sarcastic yet serious question.
 

MadMonk

Well-Known Member
Good question.
(I'm a design draftsman...famously anal trade ;) ASME Y14.5 trained:eek:)

It is generally regarded as the best starting point, which I've come to accept over the years. Sometimes I use a little more, sometimes a little less, but I always start there, then adjust a gram or so. Mostly, it stays at that ratio. I will say that using less has never panned out for my tastes. Main thing, I guess, is that we find a ratio that works for us.

It is a controlled extraction based on factors of Temperature, Time, Stages, Grind size related to saturation, etc, are all important. Damned chemistry, or in my case, black magic.

You wouldn't think it would make much of a difference, but I'll damned that it does. Especially if you just go by volume, which can vary significantly. The consistency I've experienced is rewarding. BTW, I'm constantly reminded of the volume differences by how high up the weighed grinds go in my brewers.

I remember trying different origin beans, and hating some, loving some, etc. Once I started weighing I realized I had to revisit a lot of beans. I wound up liking a lot higher percentage, and it has held pretty true over the years.

Hope my answer makes sense.
 

MadMonk

Well-Known Member
Drip, French Press, Gravity.....what kind of brewing system are you using?
Yes :D

I do French press, with a fairly unique method, and pour overs which give me one fresh mug at a time. I have a Drip Pot, but only use it if I have to, like a bigger group of company.

My favorite pour over is the Kalita Wave. I use the model 155. Makes a less muddy, more complex cup than the conicals. At least with my palate. I use the same mug every day, so I know all my measurements, and have great coffee in 6 minutes.
 

BlindedByScience

Proud Father of a brave U.S. Marine
Three scoops of Killer Beans into the Baratza. Fresh water from the tap (which is filtered, conditioned, well water). Beans in the French Press, covered with water just off the boil. Five minutes later.....bliss.

Most critical measurement is the three scoops.....no 100'ths decimal place required.....:cool:
 

Scap

Well-Known Member
I was thinking about this earlier today.
I allow myself two constant luxuries, Coffee and Tobacco. I'ved tried countless Coffee suppliers, origins, brew methods, water temperatures, etc.

I have known for several years that the absolute best, single most broad spectrum practice I ever adapted, was weighing my coffee. I was a Barista as a kid, and learned this. Part of what I was shown was how different origin/roast level beans would measure differently, by volume. Sometimes drastically.

I brew at a about a 17.42 to 1 Ratio, by weight, water to coffee. I consistently get a great cup.

If you're a coffee nut, you owe it to yourself to get a digital scale and start weighing.
I can only do 16.9 as that's what's in my bottles of water..... :D
 

Succubus

Well-Known Member
So what is the exact chemical composition of your water? Want to make sure I have the proper mineral content to follow your weight guidelines :p
 

MadMonk

Well-Known Member
I use 31.184 g hand ground coffee to 33.8 oz bottled water in my Chemex 8 cup coffee pot.
Hey, if you like it that way, you're styling. Wish I loved $1.00 cigars! I'd be rich!

ETA: probably safe to round that off to 31.2 gm of coffee. :D
 

Scap

Well-Known Member
It's water that's been filtered after going through the urinary tracts of Asian Palm Civets. :p
Had to look those up, now I'm sad. Greedy bastards caging these animals and force feeding them coffee berries deserve the same.
 
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