COVID-19 vaccine, you getting it?

Breedy

Busted
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Nov 14, 2007
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2,119
I just got my second Moderna shot on Friday. Suffered slight fatigue, but it wasn't too big of a deal. The first shot in February knocked me on my butt though. Anecdotally, everyone says either the first or second shot will be rough. The med tech who gave me the second shot said if the first one is rough, it's usually a sign someone's already had COVID.

This mirrors my non-scientific observations of people at my FD. I got the virus and the first shot was pretty rough, an experience mirrored by a lot of other people who were know to have COVID. For those who did not have it, or have a reaction to the 1st, the 2nd was worse.
 

Cparker

My dogs don't smoke
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Sep 7, 2004
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I appreciate learning of other Cigar Pass members experiences. Kann's comment is interesting to me as the information I had seen on Hawaii, which is admittedly old dating back to summer 2020, was Hawaii had low case counts based on being an island. I know the virus was in Atlanta well before March 2020 and can easily be attributable to the Atlanta airport. Albany, Ga., which has a population of less than 100K, was a material hot spot dues to a person from Atlanta who attended a funeral and infected 23 people. This led to Dougherty County (where Albany is) having some of the largest numbers of cases for several months. Rome, Ga., which is smaller than Albany, had an outbreak dues to an employee at the Pirelli tire plant singing in a church choir. He has just been in meetings with Pirelli personnel from Italy in January 2020 as the virus was impacting Italy.

Paralleling this to the Spanish Flu (as it is commonly referenced) the Spanish Flupandemic ran from 2018 to 2020. WWI troop movements, the predominant international travel at the time, was a key factor in the spread. From what I have seen and read, it appeared and disappeared with no real clear understanding of why. At best, I view this as Mother Nature's time keeping and mine are not synchronous. Perhaps this is similar to the 17 year Cicada which seems odd to my clock.

I saw a news show with Dr. Fauci where he stated that booster shots may be needed in the fall for those that are vaccinated. I understand the mRNA methodology is not "new" and the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are mRNA. I understand the J&J vaccine is the old school injection with dead virus similar to the inoculations I received as a kid.I am cautious about getting vaccinated based on unclear information about prior infection immunity and how long it lasts. If I get vaccinated, I lean toward the J&J because from kindergarten through the US Navy, this is similar to what the prior pricks gave me.

Understanding the sensitivities and the idea that a poll may more align with Cigar Pass rules, I do not find that a poll provides as much information. I like learning of other persons experiences to help me further my understanding. So for me, understanding prior infection immunity is a key factor in getting the vaccine. And, at this point, I would want the J&J variety.
 

Scap

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But then look at the other side of the story .......... the US has only 4.5% of the world's population BUT 25% of the world's COVID deaths.

I didn't make that up; those are facts ............ nothing to be joyous about, nor proud of ............. it's pretty sad, actually ................

Not sure I agree with those stats, but that's for another forum.
 

CigSid

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But then look at the other side of the story .......... the US has only 4.5% of the world's population BUT 25% of the world's COVID deaths.

I didn't make that up; those are facts ............ nothing to be joyous about, nor proud of ............. it's pretty sad, actually ................
Why don’t we drop this conversation... and end this post as of now.
 

SKYDIVNEKD

Call me "Walt Kowalski"
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But then look at the other side of the story .......... the US has only 4.5% of the world's population BUT 25% of the world's COVID deaths.

I didn't make that up; those are facts ............ nothing to be joyous about, nor proud of ............. it's pretty sad, actually ................

If you've read through this thread, many members have tried to keep this on track, and keep it from getting locked. Then there are a few that are bound and determined to keep pushing us in the other direction. Do the stats you posted affect your decision to get the vaccine or not? Do they mirror any interactions you've had with the vaccine? There's really only one other reason you'd post this shit! Take it elsewhere!

Floyd T
 

ConDaddy

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Sep 23, 2020
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717
I’m most likely going to get it once I have the option. My parents are both done with shot #1 and will receive their second shot tomorrow. After the first shot my mom got extremely sick for about 48 hours. Which I wasn’t expecting since they bit already had Covid and went through it about 3 months ago.

My employer has already informed us they are going to require all employees to get the vaccine before returning to the office in June. As a sales rep we are exempt and will not be returning to the office but I figured if the rest of our company is doing it then I should as well.
 

Cparker

My dogs don't smoke
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Sep 7, 2004
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Next question: Do any of the manufacturers seem to be incurring more side effects than the other (I know that J&J is just now out). From what I understand, most of Europe is using the AstraZeneca, while USoA is predominantly (but not totally) Pfizer and Moderna. Is that correct? The Netherlands is distributing AstraZeneca, but just got the email today from the embassy to make an appointment for the Pfizer poke.

The CDC has some resources on the US vaccines which are Moderna, Pfizer and now J&J:



For the VAERS data it is worth noting that these are deaths reported after the vaccination but do not have evidence that the death is attributable to the vaccine. Given that many persons who elect the vaccine have underlying health conditions (which may be the cause of death), I do not know how helpful the VAERS data is other than to track deaths to see if there is a trend warranting further investigation.

I would imagine the EU or other European health organizations have similar data for the A-Z vaccine.
 

kann

One Leg Of Fury.
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The CDC has some resources on the US vaccines which are Moderna, Pfizer and now J&J:



For the VAERS data it is worth noting that these are deaths reported after the vaccination but do not have evidence that the death is attributable to the vaccine. Given that many persons who elect the vaccine have underlying health conditions (which may be the cause of death), I do not know how helpful the VAERS data is other than to track deaths to see if there is a trend warranting further investigation.

I would imagine the EU or other European health organizations have similar data for the A-Z vaccine.

Thanks for that!
 

CigSid

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Thanks for that!

According to data released as of Feb. 12, 15,923 adverse reactions to COVID vaccines, including 929 deaths, have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) since Dec. 14, 2020.

The latest VAERS data show that 799 of the deaths were reported in the U.S., and that about one-third of those deaths occurred within 48 hours of the individual receiving the vaccination.

As is consistent with previous VAERS data reports, 192 of the reported deaths — or 21% — were cardiac-related. As The Defender reported earlier this month, Dr. J. Patrick Whelan, a pediatric rheumatologist, warned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in December that mRNA vaccines like those developed by Pfizer and Moderna could cause heart attacks and other injuries in ways not assessed in safety trials.

Of the 929 deaths reported since Dec. 14, 2020, the average age of the deceased was 77.8 and the youngest was 23. Fifty-two percent of the reported deaths were among men, 45% were women and 3% are unknown. Fifty-eight percent of the deaths were reported in people who received the Pfizer vaccine, and 41% were related to the Moderna vaccine.

States with the highest reported number of deaths were: California (71); Florida (50); Ohio (38); New York (31); Kentucky (41); Michigan (31); and Texas (31).

CBS Detroit reported this week that a 68-year old news anchor died one day after being vaccinated for COVID of a suspected stroke.

Reports of deaths among elderly people after being vaccinated for COVID continue to surface, including the article published this week by The Defender about 46 nursing home residents in Spain who died within one month of receiving the Pfizer vaccine.
 
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So I have a serious question about the handful of variants now floating out there (the UK, the South Africa, the California, etc). If you had just regular Covid before these variations came about, would the antibodies that you have floating around in your body protect you from getting Covid from one of these variations? Or are you at risk of catching Covid from one of these variants?
 

stogie fan

life is cheap - living is expensive
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If you've read through this thread, many members have tried to keep this on track, and keep it from getting locked. Then there are a few that are bound and determined to keep pushing us in the other direction. Do the stats you posted affect your decision to get the vaccine or not? Do they mirror any interactions you've had with the vaccine? There's really only one other reason you'd post this shit! Take it elsewhere!

Floyd T

Reason to post?
I posted as a reply to post # 79.
 

CigarStone

For once, knowledge is making me poor!
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4,469
I'm healthy, I'll leave the vaccine for someone who may be at risk. Far too much unknown and far too much outside influence for me to trust it anyway.
 

stogie fan

life is cheap - living is expensive
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I'm healthy, I'll leave the vaccine for someone who may be at risk. Far too much unknown and far too much outside influence for me to trust it anyway.

I agree with your observation concerning "too much unknown" but I will likely still get the vaccine.

One thing I am curious about: I have yet to see any vaccine manufacturer, or the CDC, post any information on the clinical trials for any of the vaccines.
IMO, if those that produce products (vaccines in this case) of such supposed importance to the general public, and if those that highly recommend (CDC & WHO) the general public get one of the vaccines, then why wouldn't they all make readily available the methodology of the clinical trials data, to the general public, right off the bat?

Why should something that is supposedly so important to world health be hidden, and those that are interested (like myself) have to go searching about in attempts to gain that information?

I don't care for the implications. It doesn't look good on the surface. I can't be the only one that sees this.
 
Joined
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So I have a serious question about the handful of variants now floating out there (the UK, the South Africa, the California, etc). If you had just regular Covid before these variations came about, would the antibodies that you have floating around in your body protect you from getting Covid from one of these variations? Or are you at risk of catching Covid from one of these variants?
Any thoughts on this question?
 

TexasTraveler

I'm kind of a big deal
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Any thoughts on this question?
The simply answer is no one knows , but there is a good chance that if you had one variant and then were exposed to a different variant you would not be protected from the new variant. Similar to the flu shot, it does not protect you from all different strains of the flu, making it useless if you happen to get the variant that was not in the shot.
 
Joined
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The simply answer is no one knows , but there is a good chance that if you had one variant and then were exposed to a different variant you would not be protected from the new variant. Similar to the flu shot, it does not protect you from all different strains of the flu, making it useless if you happen to get the variant that was not in the shot.
The flu example is what spurred my question.
 

Nihon_Ni

真喜志友幸
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I really appreciate this thread, as I've wanted to discuss these issues with others but it's been so politically and emotionally charged that I haven't dared to bring this up among coworkers or friends. Thanks for everyone's efforts to keep this discussion free of those landmines while we dialogue about it.

I've been surprised how much peace of mind the vaccination gives is me. It's like I can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Frankly, I never thought of this but I can certainly see this as a benefit now that you mention it.

I lived in Japan during the SARS outbreak and the H1N1 pandemic. SARS infected tens of thousands, H1N1 infected tens of millions, mostly concentrated in Asia. At the time, I lived and traveled throughout the region without so much as a moment's concern about getting sick.

While I say I'm not concerned about COVID, there is a bit of an asterisk to that statement. I'm not concerned enough to curtail any of the activities I would otherwise do, but I do realize there is a possibility that I could get sick. But I had never thought about how a vaccine could give me additional peace of mind, so I'll have to consider that. It's probably like the peace of mind I got when one day I decided to reach into my investment account and withdraw some cash to pay off my mortgage 10 years early. Although I'm pretty analytical, and I had measured the risk of a mortgage vs. the higher potential gain of having money invested in mutual funds, there was a distinct peace of mind that came over me when I logged into my mortgage account a week later and it said, "Paid in Full." I must have stared at that screen for 10 minutes and let the gravity of officially owning my own home wash over me. It was a feeling I wasn't expecting, and I bet it's the same type of thing the vaccine provides.
 
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