Don't they Teach History Anymore?

#22
Growing up in Jersey, my history classes were the birth of the US, the civil war and then Civil Rights/Vietnam(taught by my football coach who seemingly set a record for most crashed Huey’s in Vietnam!). However, I’ve been curious how history lessons change as your geography changes. For instance, we didn’t really learn much beyond the basics about the gold rush or much about the Louisiana Purchase and nothing on Hawaii or Alaskan history.
What was y’alls experience growing up?
 
#23
I went to elementary school in Louisiana, and as I recall there was quite a bit about the Louisiana Purchase, and also about the Acadians (now "Cajuns") but other than an extra credit GT course in Russian history in Nebraska I don't really remember much else. Went to five schools in four states in three years so it's all a bit of a blur.

I do remember that I doodled a lot in history class. I'm not an auditory learner, so somehow doodling while the teacher lectured helped me remember everything for tests (I got straight As) but not much longer than that. Later in life I learned how to doodle actual notes---it's called "mind mapping"---and it changed everything.

~Boar
 
#25
My American Revolution ancestor---Connecticut Militia, our 4th generation here---settled in Vermont after the War. I'd have to dig out my notes to recall which town, but I don't blame him for leaving Stonington. Family legend is he was at the Fort Griswald Massacre but jumped the back wall before the killing started.

He's not on the plaque, but then we're all here, his generations. Couldn't have been easy, though, living when everyone you served with died at Benedict Arnold's hands.

~Boar
 
#26
Montana history classes are heavy on Lewis and Clark/Louisiana purchase. Also A LOT of Montana history, which I'm assuming is the same everywhere?
 

CMontoya79

Newb Le professional!
#27
Attended K-12 in Northern California during the 80’s-90’s. History throughout taught world history, U.S. history (from at least 2 perspectives) California history, slavery, U.S. Civil War, apartheid, civil rights, enlightenment, renaissance, European conflicts, American revolution, colonies, Manifest Destiny, Mexican American war, industrial revolution, WW1 and WW2, Vietnam, Middle East conflicts. I loved history class, I always sought more information on my own. I was fortunate to have been blessed with history teachers that loved teaching it. They were great storytellers.

Sadly, it’s been stated/published time and time again, that over half of our country doesn’t know squat about history and would likely fail a U.S. citizenship test. All accross the country and political spectrum.
 

The Black Cloud

Well-Known Member
#29
I used to think regarding one's statehood over nation was a primarily Texan thing, but I think it's kind of universal and not even a distinctly American thing. I'm sure there are as many civic rivalries between city states as there are city states out there.

Speaking for myself, I can understand identifying as a Californian, and an Angeleno, first, and American second.

From my hazy recollection, I remember history classes focusing a lot on Mexican occupation of this land, Mexican-American war, slavery, and civil rights, on top of the universal subjects of the colonies and independence from Britain.

The specific area I was raised in and still live was all ranchos for Mexican elite/military veterans and missions hundreds of years ago. Even now a ton of the names around these parts reflect that cultural heritage.
 

CBoukal

Long time Newbie
#30
I can't believe what I am reading. Do you guys really think that Paul Bunyan would want us to sit around and belittle people about their education. When he became the first president of this country I am sure he wanted us to all live infamy like he said in his great speech. When the Russians were invading the colonies and we fought them back to gain our independence, they were standing up for the rights of all 50 states to teach what they wanted. If Al Gore didn't create this great internet for us, where would we be then....
 

Devil Doc

When Death smiles, Corpsmen smile back
#31
I can't believe what I am reading. Do you guys really think that Paul Bunyan would want us to sit around and belittle people about their education. When he became the first president of this country I am sure he wanted us to all live infamy like he said in his great speech. When the Russians were invading the colonies and we fought them back to gain our independence, they were standing up for the rights of all 50 states to teach what they wanted. If Al Gore didn't create this great internet for us, where would we be then....
Comedians. I hear there's a lot 'em out of work these days.

Doc
 

vortex

"A billion Eddie Barzoons jogging into the future
#33
The smart ones from the south know that text books are typically not correct and put it in a suitable for kids ears type forum. So, that being said, most southerners don’t look outside their textbook unfortunately....
They are in the majority, that's for sure. Most of us are because, unless we were lucky to have a mentor (usually a grandparent) clue us in, we believed those in authority. I don't know how different the south is in this regard.

One would think the Northern War of Aggression would have instilled a healthy skepticism in the population for many generations. I lived in Winterhaven Florida during the early eighties and I was always introduced as " my Yankee friend". They still remembered it at that time. :)

Edit to add: My next door neighbor didn't respect authority at all, God bless him. During a tough time we poached to survive without a mention of the authorities. Of course, being a southern man, he was taught how to live off the land by his family.
I suspect this tradition is waning but I don't know.
 
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Thoughts

Forehead wrinkle king
#34
They are in the majority, that's for sure. Most of us are because, unless we were lucky to have a mentor (usually a grandparent) clue us in, we believed those in authority. I don't know how different the south is in this regard.

One would think the Northern War of Aggression would have instilled a healthy skepticism in the population for many generations. I lived in Winterhaven Florida during the early eighties and I was always introduced as " my Yankee friend". They still remembered it at that time. :)

Edit to add: My next door neighbor didn't respect authority at all, God bless him. During a tough time we poached to survive without a mention of the authorities. Of course, being a southern man, he was taught how to live off the land by his family.
I suspect this tradition is waning but I don't know.
I do not, by any means, speak for most, or even some, southerners. You mainly hit the nail on the head when talking about others in 'authority.' As our education systems did provide guidance into some fields, history was dictated by those with degrees to those that developed through life without seeking further knowledge outside what was taught by their 'mentors.' AKA trusting what was taught because what does it matter anyway?

Seeking understanding into the past, like others have quoted from influential leaders, can help change the future. That may be why some southerners are so stuck in their ways as their teachings are brought through others and not questioned.

Edit: this is not to say that any one side is right. This is primarily saying that I hope others believe what they do based on research and studying rather than what they learned in high school lol.

Edit Edit: This is definitely not to down others with teaching degrees in the south. Another thing that I learned over the years is that the more outspoken you are about a topic that is written in a textbook in certain areas, the more they wish to replace you if it is not the majority THOUGHTS on the topic, unfortunately.
 

AVB

Jesus of Cool, I'm bad, I'm nationwide
#35
One book I remember really clearly to this day is "The Arms of Krupp" . . . 1500+ pages, read it the summer after 7th grade IIRC. Traces the history of Krupp Arms (yes, the company that makes coffee machines now) from the 11th century through WWII as the weapons supplier to Germany (and a bunch of other countries) down through the centuries. Fascinating read.

~Boar
That is still on my bookshelf.
 
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