Homemade Bread ?

Set-In-Stone

The Dude Abides
I've tried twice to do a wild yeast sourdough with out any luck.

I'll give it another try.
It took me an entire year to get the Rosemary Olive Oil recipe down to memory and accurate consistency. Some batches were better than others and was a little rough at the start. It took many attempts on how long to mix the dough before letting it rise….how much kneading was necessary before letting rise again….how long to let rise…what to place it on (pizza stone, flat pan, etc). It can seem like a waste of time at first, but persistence will pay off, and you will be thankful for the extra attempts in the beginning.
 

ironpeddler

Ye Old Newbie
I have pretty much mastered a few recipes. I started with JHolmes' 'Rosemary Olive Oil' bread and tried a few others, but I kept going back to the Rosemary bread. It is fantastic!! I tweaked mine over time and found out that adding (1) egg as well as 1/2cup of bread flour right into the mix worked best. I make it all the time now, especially in the winter months, and my neighbors love when I show up with a couple fresh loafs in hand. I no longer look at the recipe and can crank out a few loafs/day easily. Thanks again all.

Has anyone ever tried making potato bread?
The potato breads I've made in the past have been OK at best...and I've tried some very good recipes. I've come to the realization that one is best bought and not homemade. The rosemary bread is great, I've made that one a bunch of times...along with my old standby...onion dill bread.

I've tried twice to do a wild yeast sourdough with out any luck.

I'll give it another try.
Sourdough is tough unless you have a good starter...and that part seems to elude me as well.
 

Thoughts

Forehead wrinkle king
The potato breads I've made in the past have been OK at best...and I've tried some very good recipes. I've come to the realization that one is best bought and not homemade. The rosemary bread is great, I've made that one a bunch of times...along with my old standby...onion dill bread.



Sourdough is tough unless you have a good starter...and that part seems to elude me as well.
Send me you’s guy’s email through message and I will email my grandfathers recipe for sourdough bread and how to make and maintain a starter That you can upkeep. It’s a lot of work over a few days but well worth the wait. I even mixed up the recipe and make a cinnamon almond roll with it once. Everything done by hand so haven’t tried mixer. Let me know if interested!

I stopped many years back because I too, get fluffy, when eating entire loafs
 

Devil Doc

When Death smiles, Corpsmen smile back
My wife is an excellent baker, but bread eludes her. I keep telling her that yeast is a living thing. It does no good. She's a nurse for crying out loud.

Doc
 

PetersCreek

Codger-in-training
I've dabbled in bread making but I haven't gotten into it heavily yet. I do like to make pretzels and pretzel breads, though.



I have one book on the subject: Pretzel Making at Home by Andrea Slonecker. Making pretzels appeals to my inner science geek since the recipe calls for a dip in a hot, caustic lye solution prior to baking. Can't have that deep brown crust...or the flavor...without it.
 

smellysell

Go Vols!!!
I've dabbled in bread making but I haven't gotten into it heavily yet. I do like to make pretzels and pretzel breads, though.



I have one book on the subject: Pretzel Making at Home by Andrea Slonecker. Making pretzels appeals to my inner science geek since the recipe calls for a dip in a hot, caustic lye solution prior to baking. Can't have that deep brown crust...or the flavor...without it.
Recipe please!
 

PetersCreek

Codger-in-training
Recipe please!
Sorry I missed your reply for so long! The book is packed with a lot of information about the process but here's the basic recipe:

One ¼-oz/7g package active dry yeast (I use 2¼ tsp bread machine yeast)
½ cup/120 ml warm water (between 100 and 115°F/38 and 45°C)
1 tbsp barley malt syrup or 1 tbsp firmly packed dark brown sugar. (I've used light molasses in a pinch)
3¼ cups/420 g unbleached bread flour
½ cup/120 ml cold pilsner-style beer
2 tbsp unsalted butter, cubed, at room temperature, plus more for greasing the bowl
2 tsp fine sea salt

Dipping solution:
2 tbsp food-grade lye
6 cups water​

Stir yeast and barley malt syrup into warm water. If using traditional yeast, allow yeast to bloom for 5-7 minutes before proceeding. Stir in flour, beer, butter and salt until a shaggy mess. Using a stand mixer (dough hook, medium-low speed) or by hand on a floured board, knead until a smooth ball forms. It should be tacky but not sticky. If it's too dry to form, add water 1 tsp at a time. Continue kneading until elastic. Put it in a covered, greased bowl or a greased plastic bag and put it in the fridge for 8-24 hours. Longer = better flavor.

Allow dough to rise until doubled. Divide into eight portions for pretzels or dinner rolls...six portions for sandwich rolls. Shape as desired, cover with a damp towel, and allow to rise at room temperature until size increases by half.

Prepare dipping solution by filling a stainless steel pot with 6 cups of water. Wearing rubber gloves, add lye 1 tsp at a time. Heat solution on the stove top until it just starts to steam. Remove from heat until steam subsides (~5 minutes).

Obligatory warning: pure lye (or caustic soda) can cause eye damage and skin burns on contact. The prepared solution can do so to a lesser extent and vapors from the heated solution can cause respiratory irritation or injury. Work in a well ventilated kitchen and wear appropriate protective gear.

Why am I baking with poison? Even though you're dipping dough in a caustic solution, everything's going to be just fine. Baking causes a chemical reaction (a modified Maillard reaction) in the surface of the dough, involving the lye, proteins, and sugars. This renders the lye harmless and results in the lovely brown crust pretzels are known for.

Using a skimmer, dip the shaped dough into the hot solution for 20 seconds, turning after 10 seconds. Drain well and place on baking sheet. Top with coarse sea salt, if desired. Make a ¼-inch slit in each piece with a wicked sharp knife or razor blade (or bread "lame") and bake:

For pretzels and dinner rolls: 500°F for for 8–12 minutes
For sandwich rolls: 450°F for 12–16 minutes​
 
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